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Legio VI Event Information
April 21or 28 Confession of Justus

Cartersville Georgia

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April 21or 28 Confession of Justus | May 27 Memorial Day Timeline | June 7-8 Roman Days

 

Participant Information

 

Salvete Salutatores!

 

Greetings to our fellow Legionairies from the Leg VI Garrison of the far flung Province of Median Carolinas. Thank you for your interest in participation in Legio VI’s “Confession of Justus” presentation.  Enclosed you will find all the information necessary for your participation as well as site specific information.  For additional information, please check the Legio VI website at http://LegVI.tripod.com , email the Commander at JustusLonginus@aol.com  or LegioVIFerrata@aol.com or the unit armory at LegionArmory@aol.com.  We may also be reached via phone at (843) 437-5587 or (843) 818-2476.

 

We look forward to working with you!

 

Avete,

 

Rusty Myers

RKA Justus Rustius Longinus


 

Saturday, March 1, 2002  Muster (in period attire) at 5pm at the hotel,  we will go to dinner and then to rehearsal at the church at 7pm.   We will be done by 9pm.

 

Sunday, March 2, 2002  Muster time TBA.  There will be some hurry up and wait here, as we will be in place and hidden before the people arrive. We will perform in the morning and evening service.  The morning service  will be a complete surprise to the parishioners who will not know what is going on when we stomp in and take over (this part is really cool!).  For the evening service they will be told a “Special Visitor” is coming and it is being billed as a “period service” with candles, oil lamps, and period clothing for all who can do it, the idea being to bring in visitors and family that night,  but they will not know about us coming (unless of course they were in the morning service).  Should be an interesting experience for us all.  After each service we will have some time to meet and greet the people, show off our arms and armor, and talk about our  hobby.  The schedule of services is below, though our muster times will be earlier and will be announced at a later date.

 

 

 

 

 

Sunday

Bible Study

9:45 a.m.

Blended Worship

11:00 a.m.

Choir Rehearsal

4:00 - 5:45 p.m.

Evening Worship

6:00 p.m.

 


Location: 

Emerson Baptist Church
260 Joe Frank Harris Parkway
SE Cartersville, Georgia 30121
Phone: (770) 382-5874

 

Directions: 

Emerson Baptist Church is located next to US Hwy 41 North.  It is right next to the roadway and is clearly visible from the road, maybe a hundred yards away.  It is located approx. two miles inside Bartow Co., from the Bartow- Cobb Co. Line.   It is approx. thirteen miles north of Kennesaw, Ga.   Mapquest will find the address easily.  There is also a map on the Church website.

 

  
Impression Information: 

 

For this event we prefer legionaries use Red Tunica and Lorica Segmenta for uniformity, though there is no real restriction.  While we are re-enacting a 32 AD time frame, we will be using arguably later helms and armors.  Bone up on your Roman History around 31 AD.  Tiberius is the Emperor and rules from his island retreat.  Sejanus (Commander of the Praetorian Guard) was killed ten months ago by Tiberius and the ranks of Rome’s elite were purged as he was attempting a coup.  The Crucifixion of Jesus occurred roughly Eleven months previous and was performed by the unit we are portraying  (we are aware that we do not know who performed the crucifixion, Leg VI, X, and XII were in the area, and it may have been performed by Syrian Auxiliaries, for the purpose of the performance, we assume the sixth did the deed).  Other period specific data would add to the impression after “Confession of Justus” is performed, so feel free to forward it to us to add to this information.  We do need a Signifer (we have a Leg VI Vexillum, but our Signifer impression is in its infancy) and an Optio (which we would prefer to get from another unit).  If you have good impression of either, please let us know.  Our goal is to be as accurate as possible.

 

You do not need to be an actor to participate!  Only the Centurion has lines, so even rehearsal is more of a “where to stand and go” type of rehearsal.

 

Legionaries will need (at a minimum):

-          Tunic

-          Lorica Segmenta or Hamata

-          Helmet (no crest)

-          Scutum (no cover)

-          Pilum (one)

-          Gladius

-          Pugio

-          Balteus

-         Caligae


General Event Guidelines:

 

1.     No alcohol or drugs, this is a church sponsored event and our behavior will be appropriate to that.

  1. If the event includes campfires they will be built only in authorized fire pits.  Each fire will have a designated fire watch at all times.
  2. The Leg VI, The LegionArmory, Church, Pastor, and staff will not be held responsible for accidents, injury, or lost items.  Please be careful and obey the rules.
  3. Civilian handling of any legionaries weapon (Gladius, Pugio, or Pilum) must be supervised by the legionary to whom the weapon belongs or is assigned.  Civilians will not be allowed to handle weapons unsupervised.
  4. Rules imposed by the sponsoring agency will supercede these and must be followed.
  5. Violations of the rules may result in dismissal from the event.

 

Lodging and Meals:

The Sponsor will be responsible for all meals on Sunday.  In addition they will cover the lodging expenses at a local hotel.   Saturday meal may also be covered, but we do not have that confirmed yet.

 

 

A Brief History of The Sixth Imperial Legion of Rome

     Raised in Cisalpine Gaul in 52 BC by Julius Caesar, the Sixth Legion served with him during his tenure as governor and was withdrawn to Spain in 49 BC where it earned the title Hispaniensis. (Caesars Gallic Wars) 

     Later seeing action at Pharsalus in 48 BC, Julius Caesar took the 6th to Alexandria to settle the dispute in Egypt with Cleopatra. Alexandria was laid to siege and the 6th was almost wiped out losing almost two thirds of its entire manpower. Caesar eventually triumphed when reinforcements arrived. (The Alexandrian War, attributed to Caesar)

     Caesar took his “Veteran Sixth Legion” with him to Syria and Pontus.  (The Alexandrian War, attributed to Caesar, 33).

“When Caesar reached Pontus he gathered all his forces together in one spot.  They were modest in number and experience of war, with the exception of the veteran Sixth Legion, which he had brought with him from Alexandria; but this had gone through such toil and danger and been so reduced in size, in part by the difficulties of the marches and voyages, and in part by the frequency of campaigning, that it contained less than a thousand men…”  (The Alexandrian War, attributed to Caesar, 76)

     The Legion then served in Pontus under Caesar in 48 and 47 BC.  This culminated in the battle of Zela (a town in Pontus) where victory was won by Legio VI.

The origin of our victory lay in the bitter and intense hand-to-hand battle joined on the right wing, where the veteran Sixth Legion was stationed.  (The Alexandrian War, attributed to Caesar, 76)

Caesar was quite overjoyed at such a victory, although he had been victorius in many battles.  He had brought a major war to an astonishingly rapid endHe ordered the Sixth Legion back to Italy to receive their rewards and honors…” (The Alexandrian War, attributed to Caesar, 77)

     During Caesar’s African war against Scipio, the Sixth Legion deserted en masse from Scipio to reinforce Caesar and fought under him.  (The African War, attributed to Caesar, 35 and 52)

     The legion was disbanded in 45 BC after Munda establishing a colony at Arelate (Arles), but was re-formed by Lepidus the following year (44 BC) and given over to Marcus Antonius the year after that. Following the defeat of the republican generals Cassius and Brutus in successive battles at Philippi in 42 BC and the subsequent division of control between Antony and Octavian, a colony was again formed from retired veterans at Beneventum in 41 BC  (this is the colony which it is believed became Legio VI Victrix) and the remainder of Legio VI Ferrata was taken by Antony to the East where it garrisoned Judea. (Life in Ancient Rome, Adkins and Adkins)

     Legio VI fought in the Parthian War in 36 BC.  (Life in Ancient Rome, Adkins and Adkins)

     Another Legio VI Victrix evidently saw action at Perusia in 41 BC, which presents us with a problem because the official Legio VI Ferrata was at that moment with Anthony in the East. This is explained in Lawrence Keppie's excellent book The Making of the Roman Army - from Republic to Empire (pp.134);

“Octavian did not hesitate to duplicate legionary numerals already in use by Antony. The latter had serving with him V Alaudae, VI Ferrata and X Equestris. Soon we find Octavian's army boasting of a V (the later Macedonica), VI (the later Victrix) and X (soon to be Fretensis). Of these, V and X, and less certainly VI, bore under the empire a bull-emblem which would normally indicate a foundation by Caesar; but the true Caesarian legions with these numerals (Alaudae, Ferrata and Equestris) were with Antony.”

     It would seem, therefore, that Octavian had again used the veterans of Caesars Sixth Legion, this time from those left at Beneventum, to form the core of his own Sixth Legion used at Perusia.

     Both Legio VI’s (Ferrata and Victrix) fought at the battle of Actium, after this event the VI Ferrata was dispatched back to Judea and the next time we hear of the  VI Victrix was in Spain.

     Legio VI Ferrata was severely mauled at the Battle of Actium in 31BC by the forces loyal to Caesar's nephew and heir, Octavian. Following Actium, another colony of veterans seems to have been created at Byllis, probably together with soldiers from other legions, and the remainder of VI Ferrata was moved to Syria/Judea where it was to remain.

     From 9 B.C. to 73 A.D. the VI Ferrata was garrisoned the area of Judea.  (Palestine) It was in this time frame (historians differ as to the exact year) that one Jesus Christ was tried before Pontius Pilatus, the Roman Governor of Judea.  (Tacitus, Seutonius, Epictitius, et al)

     From 54 to 68 AD the Legion served under Corbulo at Artaxata and Tigranocerta against the Parthians. (The Roman Imperial Army, Webster)

     In 69 AD the Legion returned to Judea and fought in the Jewish Civil War.  As the Jewish Civil War wound down, the sixth was placed under Mucianis and fought against Vitellius.  Legion VI was largely responsible for Mucianis victory over the forces of Vitellius during the brief Roman Civil War . (Tacitus, Hist III, pg 46)

     106 AD the legion can be placed at Bostra under A. Cornelius Palma. (Notes on Parthian Campaign of Trajan, JRS, p35)

     138 AD the legion is stationed in Palestine, but briefly sent to Africa during the Reign of Antonius Pius.  (The Roman Imperial Army, Webster)

     150 AD the legion was again in Judea. (Life in Ancient Rome, Adkins & Adkins)

     215 AD, the last reference found to Legio VI Ferrata Fidelas Constans places them still stationed in Palestine. (Life in Ancient Rome, Adkins & Adkins)

 

Notes on the Legion Title and Symbol

 

     The Nickname “Ferrata” literally means “Iron Shod” and may refer to a new form of metal cuirass introduced by this legion (The Roman Army, and Life in Ancient Rome, Adkins and Adkins) though their sourcing is unclear.  It could also simply mean “The Iron Legion”.

 

     The title “Fidelas Constans” means Loyal and Steady.  It is unknown when this was added to the legion’s title, though there are several incidents in the early 1st Century where it could have been appropriately  awarded.

 

     The Legion’s symbol was the Roman Wolf and Twins. (The Roman Imperial Army, Webster and Life in Ancient Rome, Adkins and Adkins).

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Participant Information

 

Salvete Salutatores!

 

Greetings to our fellow Legionairies from the Leg VI Garrison of the far flung Province of Median Carolinas. Thank you for your interest in participation in Legio VI’s “Confession of Justus” presentation.  Enclosed you will find all the information necessary for your participation as well as site specific information.  For additional information, please check the Legio VI website at http://LegVI.tripod.com , email the Commander at JustusLonginus@aol.com  or LegioVIFerrata@aol.com or the unit armory at LegionArmory@aol.com.  We may also be reached via phone at (843) 437-5587 or (843) 818-2476.

 

We look forward to working with you!

 

Avete,

 

Rusty Myers

RKA Justus Rustius Longinus


 

Saturday, March 1, 2002  Muster (in period attire) at 5pm at the hotel,  we will go to dinner and then to rehearsal at the church at 7pm.   We will be done by 9pm.

 

Sunday, March 2, 2002  Muster time TBA.  There will be some hurry up and wait here, as we will be in place and hidden before the people arrive. We will perform in the morning and evening service.  The morning service  will be a complete surprise to the parishioners who will not know what is going on when we stomp in and take over (this part is really cool!).  For the evening service they will be told a “Special Visitor” is coming and it is being billed as a “period service” with candles, oil lamps, and period clothing for all who can do it, the idea being to bring in visitors and family that night,  but they will not know about us coming (unless of course they were in the morning service).  Should be an interesting experience for us all.  After each service we will have some time to meet and greet the people, show off our arms and armor, and talk about our  hobby.  The schedule of services is below, though our muster times will be earlier and will be announced at a later date.

 

 

 

 

 

Sunday

Bible Study

9:45 a.m.

Blended Worship

11:00 a.m.

Choir Rehearsal

4:00 - 5:45 p.m.

Evening Worship

6:00 p.m.

 


Location: 

Emerson Baptist Church
260 Joe Frank Harris Parkway
SE Cartersville, Georgia 30121
Phone: (770) 382-5874

 

Directions: 

Emerson Baptist Church is located next to US Hwy 41 North.  It is right next to the roadway and is clearly visible from the road, maybe a hundred yards away.  It is located approx. two miles inside Bartow Co., from the Bartow- Cobb Co. Line.   It is approx. thirteen miles north of Kennesaw, Ga.   Mapquest will find the address easily.  There is also a map on the Church website.

 

  
Impression Information: 

 

For this event we prefer legionaries use Red Tunica and Lorica Segmenta for uniformity, though there is no real restriction.  While we are re-enacting a 32 AD time frame, we will be using arguably later helms and armors.  Bone up on your Roman History around 31 AD.  Tiberius is the Emperor and rules from his island retreat.  Sejanus (Commander of the Praetorian Guard) was killed ten months ago by Tiberius and the ranks of Rome’s elite were purged as he was attempting a coup.  The Crucifixion of Jesus occurred roughly Eleven months previous and was performed by the unit we are portraying  (we are aware that we do not know who performed the crucifixion, Leg VI, X, and XII were in the area, and it may have been performed by Syrian Auxiliaries, for the purpose of the performance, we assume the sixth did the deed).  Other period specific data would add to the impression after “Confession of Justus” is performed, so feel free to forward it to us to add to this information.  We do need a Signifer (we have a Leg VI Vexillum, but our Signifer impression is in its infancy) and an Optio (which we would prefer to get from another unit).  If you have good impression of either, please let us know.  Our goal is to be as accurate as possible.

 

You do not need to be an actor to participate!  Only the Centurion has lines, so even rehearsal is more of a “where to stand and go” type of rehearsal.

 

Legionaries will need (at a minimum):

-          Tunic

-          Lorica Segmenta or Hamata

-          Helmet (no crest)

-          Scutum (no cover)

-          Pilum (one)

-          Gladius

-          Pugio

-          Balteus

-         Caligae


General Event Guidelines:

 

1.     No alcohol or drugs, this is a church sponsored event and our behavior will be appropriate to that.

  1. If the event includes campfires they will be built only in authorized fire pits.  Each fire will have a designated fire watch at all times.
  2. The Leg VI, The LegionArmory, Church, Pastor, and staff will not be held responsible for accidents, injury, or lost items.  Please be careful and obey the rules.
  3. Civilian handling of any legionaries weapon (Gladius, Pugio, or Pilum) must be supervised by the legionary to whom the weapon belongs or is assigned.  Civilians will not be allowed to handle weapons unsupervised.
  4. Rules imposed by the sponsoring agency will supercede these and must be followed.
  5. Violations of the rules may result in dismissal from the event.

 

Lodging and Meals:

The Sponsor will be responsible for all meals on Sunday.  In addition they will cover the lodging expenses at a local hotel.   Saturday meal may also be covered, but we do not have that confirmed yet.

 

 

A Brief History of The Sixth Imperial Legion of Rome

     Raised in Cisalpine Gaul in 52 BC by Julius Caesar, the Sixth Legion served with him during his tenure as governor and was withdrawn to Spain in 49 BC where it earned the title Hispaniensis. (Caesars Gallic Wars) 

     Later seeing action at Pharsalus in 48 BC, Julius Caesar took the 6th to Alexandria to settle the dispute in Egypt with Cleopatra. Alexandria was laid to siege and the 6th was almost wiped out losing almost two thirds of its entire manpower. Caesar eventually triumphed when reinforcements arrived. (The Alexandrian War, attributed to Caesar)

     Caesar took his “Veteran Sixth Legion” with him to Syria and Pontus.  (The Alexandrian War, attributed to Caesar, 33).

“When Caesar reached Pontus he gathered all his forces together in one spot.  They were modest in number and experience of war, with the exception of the veteran Sixth Legion, which he had brought with him from Alexandria; but this had gone through such toil and danger and been so reduced in size, in part by the difficulties of the marches and voyages, and in part by the frequency of campaigning, that it contained less than a thousand men…”  (The Alexandrian War, attributed to Caesar, 76)

     The Legion then served in Pontus under Caesar in 48 and 47 BC.  This culminated in the battle of Zela (a town in Pontus) where victory was won by Legio VI.

The origin of our victory lay in the bitter and intense hand-to-hand battle joined on the right wing, where the veteran Sixth Legion was stationed.  (The Alexandrian War, attributed to Caesar, 76)

Caesar was quite overjoyed at such a victory, although he had been victorius in many battles.  He had brought a major war to an astonishingly rapid endHe ordered the Sixth Legion back to Italy to receive their rewards and honors…” (The Alexandrian War, attributed to Caesar, 77)

     During Caesar’s African war against Scipio, the Sixth Legion deserted en masse from Scipio to reinforce Caesar and fought under him.  (The African War, attributed to Caesar, 35 and 52)

     The legion was disbanded in 45 BC after Munda establishing a colony at Arelate (Arles), but was re-formed by Lepidus the following year (44 BC) and given over to Marcus Antonius the year after that. Following the defeat of the republican generals Cassius and Brutus in successive battles at Philippi in 42 BC and the subsequent division of control between Antony and Octavian, a colony was again formed from retired veterans at Beneventum in 41 BC  (this is the colony which it is believed became Legio VI Victrix) and the remainder of Legio VI Ferrata was taken by Antony to the East where it garrisoned Judea. (Life in Ancient Rome, Adkins and Adkins)

     Legio VI fought in the Parthian War in 36 BC.  (Life in Ancient Rome, Adkins and Adkins)

     Another Legio VI Victrix evidently saw action at Perusia in 41 BC, which presents us with a problem because the official Legio VI Ferrata was at that moment with Anthony in the East. This is explained in Lawrence Keppie's excellent book The Making of the Roman Army - from Republic to Empire (pp.134);

“Octavian did not hesitate to duplicate legionary numerals already in use by Antony. The latter had serving with him V Alaudae, VI Ferrata and X Equestris. Soon we find Octavian's army boasting of a V (the later Macedonica), VI (the later Victrix) and X (soon to be Fretensis). Of these, V and X, and less certainly VI, bore under the empire a bull-emblem which would normally indicate a foundation by Caesar; but the true Caesarian legions with these numerals (Alaudae, Ferrata and Equestris) were with Antony.”

     It would seem, therefore, that Octavian had again used the veterans of Caesars Sixth Legion, this time from those left at Beneventum, to form the core of his own Sixth Legion used at Perusia.

     Both Legio VI’s (Ferrata and Victrix) fought at the battle of Actium, after this event the VI Ferrata was dispatched back to Judea and the next time we hear of the  VI Victrix was in Spain.

     Legio VI Ferrata was severely mauled at the Battle of Actium in 31BC by the forces loyal to Caesar's nephew and heir, Octavian. Following Actium, another colony of veterans seems to have been created at Byllis, probably together with soldiers from other legions, and the remainder of VI Ferrata was moved to Syria/Judea where it was to remain.

     From 9 B.C. to 73 A.D. the VI Ferrata was garrisoned the area of Judea.  (Palestine) It was in this time frame (historians differ as to the exact year) that one Jesus Christ was tried before Pontius Pilatus, the Roman Governor of Judea.  (Tacitus, Seutonius, Epictitius, et al)

     From 54 to 68 AD the Legion served under Corbulo at Artaxata and Tigranocerta against the Parthians. (The Roman Imperial Army, Webster)

     In 69 AD the Legion returned to Judea and fought in the Jewish Civil War.  As the Jewish Civil War wound down, the sixth was placed under Mucianis and fought against Vitellius.  Legion VI was largely responsible for Mucianis victory over the forces of Vitellius during the brief Roman Civil War . (Tacitus, Hist III, pg 46)

     106 AD the legion can be placed at Bostra under A. Cornelius Palma. (Notes on Parthian Campaign of Trajan, JRS, p35)

     138 AD the legion is stationed in Palestine, but briefly sent to Africa during the Reign of Antonius Pius.  (The Roman Imperial Army, Webster)

     150 AD the legion was again in Judea. (Life in Ancient Rome, Adkins & Adkins)

     215 AD, the last reference found to Legio VI Ferrata Fidelas Constans places them still stationed in Palestine. (Life in Ancient Rome, Adkins & Adkins)

 

Notes on the Legion Title and Symbol

 

     The Nickname “Ferrata” literally means “Iron Shod” and may refer to a new form of metal cuirass introduced by this legion (The Roman Army, and Life in Ancient Rome, Adkins and Adkins) though their sourcing is unclear.  It could also simply mean “The Iron Legion”.

 

     The title “Fidelas Constans” means Loyal and Steady.  It is unknown when this was added to the legion’s title, though there are several incidents in the early 1st Century where it could have been appropriately  awarded.

 

     The Legion’s symbol was the Roman Wolf and Twins. (The Roman Imperial Army, Webster and Life in Ancient Rome, Adkins and Adkins).

 

 

 

 

 


 

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